3.1 Key Ideas and Details

Model

Read the passage below.

Yessir, when I started down here to plant No. 1, I was so little I had to stand on a box to reach my work. I was a spinner at first, then I learned to spool. When they put in them new winding machines, I asked them to learn me how to work ’em and they did. If I’d a-been a man no telling how far I’d-a gone. It was mighty convenient for ’em—having a hand that could do all three, but I got mad and quit. In them days there was an agreement here in the mills that if a hand was to quit one, then the other mills in town wouldn’t hire him, so I went over to Albemarle and I got me a job in the knitting mills.

Source: Wolff, Muriel L. Transcribed excerpt from Alice Caudle’s oral history. September 2, 1938. American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers’ Project, 1936–1940. Library of Congress. http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/wpa:@field%28DOCID+@lit%28wpa228120207%29%29 (January 18, 2011)

 
   

What central ideas is the author trying to express? What text evidence supports your answer? Click |here| to check your response.

How does the author structure her information? How does this affect meaning? What text evidence supports your answer? Click |here| to check your response.

What is the author’s perspective on her role in her job? What text evidence supports your answer? Click |here| to check your response.

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